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Botox and Blurry Vision

Cosmetic procedures have been prominent for both women and men for years. While the popularity of certain procedures tends to decrease and incline in waves, temporary facial “improvements” like Botox injections have become and remain one of the most popular cosmetic procedures. The popularity is thanks to its noninvasiveness, and less important influences like social media app filters that give you a visual perception of how different you can look by “just getting a little work done…”

Botox is also used at times to maintain eye alignment and treat uncontrolled eyelid twitching.

The decision is ultimately yours. While we do not oppose personal decisions within this realm, our team is here to help answer questions about anything that can pertain to the health of your eyes.

So, let’s talk about it.

The Decision-Making Process

To start, you may be wondering why we are focusing more on Botox than dermal fillers. Dermal fillers are different substances and most often used to increase volume in areas farther away from the eyes, like the lips. Botox is most often used to hinder wrinkles in the forehead and around the eyes.

While Botox injections for cosmetic reasons are often self-decided most prevalently among women older than 30, both men and women in their 20’s have started to take this facial aging preventative measure into consideration too.

As the Botox user rate increases along with other possible threats to eye health and the common problems that increase by age, one of the most proper precautions to protect your eyes is to schedule a check-up with your Optometrist first.

This precautionary action is especially important if your plan is to receive injections between the eyebrows and above the nose. This area, referred to as the glabella, is one of the riskiest areas where injections can result in vascular blindness.

The Certified Practitioner Pursuit

Taking a risk is always based on looking for a reward. Don’t take two risks in the pursuit of one reward!

The doctor or practitioner of your choice must be able to:

  1. Recognize any complications immediately
  2. Have the ability to treat them appropriately

Here are a few things to take into consideration when making the practitioner decision:

  1. Do you feel comfortable in the facility?
  2. Have the procedure risks been mentioned and fully discussed prior to your consent?
  3. Have you seen before and after photos or been able to reach out to a current patient to discuss their experience?

The Possible Perils

Cosmetician hands with botox and female patient

Botox injected by an untrained hand can permeate the wrong muscles causing a droop of the eyelid, which will ultimately settle but can be very bothersome.

The first visual disturbance case from a cosmetic facial filler was listed in 1988. The report showcased a reaction of retinal artery occlusion.

After speaking with a few users of the botulinum toxin, we received a story of one experience worth notating from a consumer in her late 20’s:

“I had Botox under my eyes once! It basically relaxed my eye muscles so much that my eyes wouldn’t shut all the way when I slept at night. It was a frustrating 3 months. It was supposed to help with the bags under my eyes but the result wasn’t as I expected. I also was extremely sensitive to light during that period of time. Other than that … my “vision” was fine.” – Julie

As facial fillers with high negative results have surely declined over the years, droopy eyelids are one of the most reported side effects that can last up to 6 months.

Other possible perils include:

  • Allergic reactions as a rejection from the body which can be detrimental to vision and eye health
  • Irritations noticeable by bloodshot eyes and temporarily blurred vision
  • Vascular occlusion, otherwise referred to as a decline of blood flow

One tip: do not rub the area of injection! Rubbing a sore area is one of the most common reactions to reduce discomfort. But, after an injection, rubbing can cause Botox to spread into other areas and lead to unwanted effects.

An immediate, emergency visit to your trusted Optometrist is suggested for reactions such as loss of vision and reactions that are highly painful or prolonged.

More Questions?

Give us a call 914-967-2020! Need to schedule an appointment? You can easily schedule an appointment here.

Sensitive Eyes & Cosmetics Guide

Putting makeup on is fun! It can also be considered one of the most relaxing and satisfying parts of getting ready… If it is being done on time, and not in a rush, which we can admit is pretty rare.

Of all the little mishaps that can take place during the getting ready process like, nicking your leg with a razor, or burning your arm with a curling iron, harming your eyes with cosmetics is a common mishap, too.

You might be surprised to read that everything from mascara to foundation and powder can have an effect on your eyes.

Allow us to guide you in what to look out for when buying and what to make sure of when using certain types of cosmetics.

Before You Buy:

List Out: Go ahead and take notes from influencer led social media videos, the newest products of your favorite brands and cosmetics that your friends and family members love.

Read Up: Don’t simply let the influencers, family, and friends easily influence your purchase decisions. There are still two steps to take. The next one? Read up on the list of product ingredients as some can lead to negative reactions to the delicate skin that helps safeguard your eyes.

Avoid These Ingredients

makeup palette

A few things to check for and avoid are parabens, phthalates, and fragrances. Otherwise known as “man-made” chemicals used to help preserve products, prolong their scents and the plastics they are packaged in. Keep in mind that these chemicals often are not simply listed as “parabens”, “phthalates”, and “fragrance”. These ingredients typically have more specific names in the ingredients list.

One of the easiest suggestions? Look out for products listed as paraben-free and fragrance-free, meaning they do not have any of those manufactured chemicals in the product recipe.

Try Before You Buy

We’re sure you’ve heard the term Try Before You Buy before. We agree, it is one worth following. Brands and stores will often provide samplers for certain products. Or you can always start your search for your personally best options by buying gift sets that house several different types of one cosmetic necessity like eyeliners or mascaras.

Give these picks a try and keep track of how your eyes and the skin around your eyes react before you transfer from testing out the snack-size product to investing in the king-size one.

While You Use:

Preparation

Wash. Your. Hands: We know you know how important this step is and that it shouldn’t only apply after your toilet has been flushed. Anything that is left on your hands like facial serums or moisturizers can transfer onto other surfaces… This brings us to step number two…

Contacts: Put your contacts in! But make sure your hands are 100% dry before application as some tap water might contain dangers to the eye. Inserting contacts before embellishing with makeup is important because it prevents your lenses from getting dirty and damaged and trapping makeup between your eye and the lens.

Clean: Also keep track of the last time you’ve washed your brushes and sponges. These very important tools can harbor and grow types of mold and bacteria dangerous to the health of your eyes.

Application

Check Expiration Date: If you’re looking to use a product you haven’t used “in a minute”, see if you can find the expiration date. Cosmetics do expire! When a product expires, your skin expires to it. If you can’t find the date, keep this in mind: properly stored and/or unopened makeup lasts for an average of 2 years.

Eyeliner: When it comes to eyeliner, we have two pieces of advice for you: always sharpen your pencil and avoid the inside of your lash line. An unsharpened pencil makes it harder to precisely apply and can scratch your eyelids and lash lines. Even if you use a liquid liner or an eyeliner pen, applying it to the inside of your lash line can block important glands and lead to painful styes.

Removal

Wash Your Face: Do not, we repeat, do not go to bed without washing your face and removing all your makeup! One of the most common issues that results from sleeping before cleansing — especially if the makeup you used is borrowed or expired—is an eye infection called conjunctivitis, better known as pink eye.

Makeup Remover: Looking to try something organic to remove your eye makeup? Try a simple concoction of witch hazel and water which often also helps reduce eye inflammation.

Replace: If you ever experience an infection of any sort, removal of the brushes and products used in that area of the face are the best next step! Quickly remove and replace to avoid spreading the bacteria that caused the infection any further.

Questions? Infections?

Give us a call at 914-967-2020! Our team at Rye Eye Care is here to help.

This or That: Maintaining Your Eyesight

365 days can manifest a great deal that you might not be able to set your sights on quite yet. Don’t wait until you can’t see it to believe it.

Quiz yourself in a quick “This or That!” and see where you stand when it comes to maintaining your eyesight and what’s worth *looking* into for your eye health before 2022.

Rye Eye Clinic – Prevent damage from Blue Light?

Rye Eye Care Real Tips from Your Rye, New York Eye Doctor

Summery:

Everywhere you look, there’s an article or blog telling you all about hazardous blue light. However, after years of experience as an optometrist in Rye, I’d like to point out that blue light isn’t the root of all evil. Your computer, phone, tablet, and every digital screen you own pose additional dangers to your vision and your sleep – beyond the dangers of blue light.

Topics: Eye exam Rye, New York, Eye care services Rye, New York, Eye Doctor Rye, New York, Dry eye treatment Rye, New York

Is Blue Light the Big and Bad Enemy?

Blue light is a short, high-energy wavelength emitted in large amounts by all electronic devices. It can pass through the eye to the retina, and laboratory studies have shown how prolonged exposure to blue light damages the retinal cells in mice. That’s one fundamental reason behind the plentiful warnings to avoid blue light. However, the results of studies on real people (not rodents) didn’t attribute blue light with the same level of risk; other risk factors can be just as threatening to human vision.

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a Comprehensive eye exam, Pediatric eye exam and Contact lens eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Is LASIK eye and vision surgery an option for you ? Our Rye eye doctor is always ready to answer your questions about eye disease and Contact lenses.

Eyes Block Blue Light Naturally

Although it’s true that digital tech emits a huge quantity of blue light, you may not know that the sun also shines mainly with blue light. In fact, on a sunny day, the light coming at you is nearly 100,000 brighter than your computer screen. Yet, few scientific studies on humans have uncovered any connection between sunlight exposure and the development of a retinal disease, such as age-related macular degeneration.

Then how did the studies show that blue light damages mice eyes? Because mice and people don’t have the same eyes. Humans have built-in protective elements – macular pigments and the natural filter of our crystalline lens – that protect against blue light. These parts of your eyes absorb the blue light before it reaches the retina at the back of your eye.

Of course, that doesn’t mean sunglasses are unnecessary. By blocking all UVA and UVB rays from your eyes, sunglasses provide many more benefits than just blocking blue light. For example, research has shown that sunglasses slow down the development of other eye diseases, such as cataracts.

Digital Devices Are Still Dangerous

Even though blue light may not be the ultimate threat posed by electronic gadgets, that doesn’t mean blue light has zero negative effects on your eyes or that your digital screens are harmless. Blue light has a powerful, adverse effect on your sleep physiology. That’s because you have photosensitive retinal ganglion cells that convey the time of day to your brain, based on how light it is in the environment. These ganglion cells, which are hypersensitive to blue light, help to set your internal clock to keep you awake and alert during the day. Therefore, when you stare at a digital screen and its blue light, your ganglion cells tell your brain it’s still daylight – even at 2 am.

What if you put a blue-light blocking filter on your tablet whenever you use it in bed? Sorry, no dice. Your retinal cells are also sensitive to light waves other than blue, so filtering out blue light won’t improve your sleep. Really, you need to dim all the colors, all the different wavelengths of light.

How to Relieve Tired Eyes and Promote Sleep

When my Rye eye clinic patients complain that their eyes are tired and they can’t sleep after looking at a screen from dawn through bedtime, I advise them to dim all screens starting from the evening hours. Bright light before bed (even from your phone screen) makes it harder to fall asleep. Even better, accept the challenge of making your bedroom a screen-free zone.

If you suffer from eye strain, it’s a good idea to call your Rye eye doctor and schedule an eye exam. It’s possible that you need a new vision prescription for glasses or contact lenses.

Last, but not least, keep your eyes lubricated! One of the best ways to do that is to blink frequently enough. When you stare at a screen, you’re probably blinking at a slower rate than normal. Consequently, your tear film evaporates and doesn’t get replenished until you walk away from your computer and begin to blink regularly again. In addition to blinking, using preservative-free artificial tears eye drops before you sit down at the computer can help boost your natural tears and keep your eye surface better lubricated.

For more tips on how to keep screens from causing uncomfortable symptoms or damaging your sight, visit your friendly Rye optometrist – I’m always happy to share helpful advice!

Rye Eye Care, your Rye eye doctor for eye exams and eye care

Alternatively, book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

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Rye Eye Clinic – What Causes Glaucoma?

Rye Eye Care Our eye doctor in Rye, New York explains

Summery: Glaucoma is an eye disease that involves an abnormal increase in your intraocular pressure (the fluid inside your eye). As the pressure rises, it damages your optic nerve. Because the optic nerve is responsible for transmitting images to your brain, this damage affects vision. When glaucoma is left untreated, the damage continues – leading to vision loss and blindness.

Topics: Glaucoma treatment Rye, Eye Exam Rye

What causes this sight-threatening condition?

Normally, your intraocular fluid (aqueous humor) flows out of the eye through a special channel – called the trabecular meshwork. When this channel gets blocked, the fluid can’t drain properly and pressure builds.

Most of the time, glaucoma is inherited and occurs in older adults, above age 60. Less commonly, glaucoma can be caused by severe eye infections, a chemical or blunt injury to your eye, inflammatory conditions, or a blockage of the blood vessels in your eye. Usually, both eyes are affected, but they may not be in exactly the same condition.

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a Comprehensive eye exam, Pediatric eye exam and Contact lens eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Is LASIK eye and vision surgery an option for you ? Our Rye eye doctor is always ready to answer your questions about eye disease and Contact lenses.

How is glaucoma detected?

Glaucoma doesn’t usually present early symptoms or pain. So the only way to know if you have it at an early stage is by visiting your Rye eye clinic for a comprehensive eye exam. Eye doctors recommend getting a complete eye exam yearly if you are older than 40 or if you have a history of glaucoma (or any eye disease, for that matter) in your family. If the signs of glaucoma are detected, you can begin glaucoma treatment in Rye – as soon as possible, which is the best way to protect your eyes and prevent vision loss!

Are there different types of glaucoma?

There are two types of glaucoma:Open-angle glaucoma (also called wide-angle glaucoma), is the most common form of this eye disease. Even though the drainage structure in your eye looks good, the intraocular fluid doesn’t flow out efficiently.

Angle-closure glaucoma (also called acute or narrow-angle glaucoma), occurs when the drain space between the iris and cornea becomes too narrow to facilitate proper drainage. Consequently, pressure rises suddenly in the eye.

Who gets glaucoma?

Risk factors for glaucoma include:

    • Over age 40
    • A family history of glaucoma
    • Asian, African, or Hispanic heritage
    • High eye pressure
    • Farsightedness or nearsightedness
    • Having had an eye injury
    • Using long-term steroid medications
    • Corneas that are thin in the center
    • Thinning of the optic nerve
    • Diabetes
    • High blood pressure
    • Migraines
    • Poor blood circulation

    What are the symptoms of glaucoma?

    The earliest symptoms of glaucoma can include a loss of peripheral vision, but usually people don’t notice any symptoms at all until late in the disease. That’s why glaucoma has been nicknamed the “sneak thief of sight.” If you want to make sure you don’t have glaucoma, book an eye exam at our Rye eye clinic.

    Occasionally, pressure can build up in your eye to an extreme level, leading to headaches, blurred vision, eye pain, or seeing halos around lights. If you experience the following glaucoma symptoms, seek immediate medical assistance:

      • An eye that appears hazy
      • Eye pain
      • Vision loss
      • Seeing halos around lights
      • Redness in the eye
      • Narrowed vision (tunnel vision)
      • Nausea or vomiting, accompanied by the listed eye symptoms

      What glaucoma treatment is provided in Rye?

      Glaucoma treatment by our Rye eye doctor may involve eye drops that reduce fluid pressure, laser surgery, or microsurgery. The goal of all of these treatments is to lower intraocular pressure in the eye. Laser surgeries accomplish this in several different ways – either by making a tiny hole in the iris to let the fluid flow more smoothly, treating areas of the eye to reduce fluid production, or opening the drainage area. Microsurgery creates a new channel for drainage.

      Is there a way to prevent glaucoma?

      Presently, there are no proven methods to prevent glaucoma. But if the disease is diagnosed early, we offer progressive glaucoma treatment in Rye, to protect your sight. Once vision is lost, it cannot be restored – but regular eye exams in our Rye eye clinic can detect the early signs of glaucoma, preventing damage to your vision before it’s too late!

      Rye Eye Care, your Rye eye doctor for eye exams and eye care

      Alternatively, book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

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      Rye Contact Lenses- Overuse of Contact Lenses – What Happens? How Can You Prevent It?

      Rye Eye Care Tips from our eye clinic on how to keep your eyes healthy with contact lenses

      Contact lenses can be a fantastic way to see crisp and clear without bothersome eyeglasses. They give a wider field of view and healthy, comfortable vision – as long as you don’t overuse them!

      Nowadays, with so many quality contact lenses on the market that provide exceptional visual clarity and convenience, it’s easy to abuse their use. However, this practice poses serious risks to your eyes. To avoid damaging your vision, our eye clinic shares the following information about avoiding the overuse of contact lenses.

      Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a Comprehensive eye exam, Pediatric eye exam and Contact lens eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Is LASIK eye and vision surgery an option for you ? Our Rye eye doctor is always ready to answer your questions about eye disease and Contact lenses.

      How much use is overuse?

      You should be removing your contact lenses for a minimum of 18 awake hours per week, giving your eyes time to rest and get sufficient oxygen. Your eyes need to absorb oxygen from the air (not from your lungs, like other organs), so allowing your eyes time to breathe without contact lenses in the way is essential.

      Don’t leave home without eyeglasses

      If you insert your contacts in the morning and will be out into the wee hours of the night, pack along a pair of glasses to switch to later in the day. This will help prevent eye strain and, ocular irritation.

      Don’t sleep in contact lenses

      Keeping your contacts in while dozing will damage your eyes, depriving them of oxygen and hydration. Without enough moisture, your contact lenses can dry out and lead to problems, such as corneal scratches.

      Replace your contact lenses on time

      Because modern contact lenses are made from advanced materials, they offer supreme comfort. That’s why so many people end up wearing them longer than prescribed – until they become uncomfortable. However, this is a risky practice that can lead to vision damage. When used for too long, contacts can develop tiny tears and accumulate calcium or protein deposits that can seriously irritate or injure your eyes. When you buy contacts from our eye clinic, we’ll provide you with instructions on how long each pair lasts and when to replace them.

      What happens from the overuse of contacts?

      There are three main problems that can result:

      • Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis (GPC): wearing your contact lenses for too long without changing them can lead to deposits in the lenses that cause Papillae (large granules that rub against the cornea) to form under the eyelids. As a result, you can experience itching, red eyes, light sensitivity, and the constant feeling that something is stuck in your eye.
      • Corneal ulcer: this is a serious infection that occurs on the outer layer of the eye and can damage vision. Wearing contact lenses while swimming can allow dangerous microbes to enter your eye. When these microbes stick to contacts, it increases your risk of corneal ulcers. Symptoms include redness, blurred vision, eye pain, and watering. Corneal ulcers require prompt medical treatment to prevent irreversible vision loss.
      • CLARE – Contact Lens Associated Red Eye: this sudden redness in your eye is typically caused by wearing contact lenses during bedtime. Insufficient oxygen to your cornea (because of tight-fitting contacts) is the culprit. It is a relatively mild problem, but you’ll need an eye exam at our eye clinic to determine whether you’re suffering from CLARE or an infection.

      When you visit our eye clinic for a contact lens eye exam or fitting, we’ll be happy to provide you with instructions on the proper way to use your contacts – and not overuse them!

      Rye Eye Care, your Rye eye doctor for eye exams and eye care

      Alternatively, book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

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      Rye Eye Clinic- Eye Stroke – How is it similar to a stroke? What are the risks?

      Rye Eye Care Our eye doctor in Rye, New York explains

      High blood pressure and other heart diseases put your overall health at risk. That’s a health fact that you probably know. But did you ever think about how high blood pressure affects the delicate tissues of your eye?

      Hypertension can damage the arteries in your eye, leading to vision loss. When one or more damaged arteries have a blockage (due either to a clot or a build-up of cholesterol), eye stroke occurs. Eye stroke refers to when there is inadequate blood flow to the eye, and it can cause sudden loss of vision. While the vision loss can be temporary, it will become permanent if you don’t seek urgent treatment from an eye care professional! Call an eye clinic near you to book an emergency eye exam.

      Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a Comprehensive eye exam, Pediatric eye exam and Contact lens eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Is LASIK eye and vision surgery an option for you ? Our Rye eye doctor is always ready to answer your questions about eye disease and Contact lenses.

      Types of eye stroke

      Retinal vein occlusion (RVO): this is the most common type of eye stroke; it involves decreased blood flow in a vein that carries blood away from the eye. As a result, the blood vessels connected closely to that vein become backed up. Retinal arterial occlusion (RAO): this is not as common as RVO, yet it can be more serious; it is caused by a direct blockage of blood flowing into the eye, and it can be a strong indicator for a brain stroke. Ischemic optic neuropathy (ION): this obstruction of blood flow to the optic nerve is associated with giant cell arteritis, a condition that involves damaged or swollen temporal arteries in the brain. If left untreated, permanent vision loss can result. Non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION): this is associated with a disruption of healthy blood flow to the optic nerve and is similar to ION.

      Symptoms of eye stroke

      While eye stroke is generally painless, it is still a dangerous sight-threatening condition! Usually, the primary symptom is vision loss, which is temporary and happens in just one eye. However, vision damage can become irreversible if you don’t seek treatment quickly from a qualified eye doctor.

      Other possible symptoms include:

        • A sudden or gradual change in vision (such as seeing gray or black in one eye), even if it improves within a few minutes
        • New floaters
        • Blurry, distorted vision.
        • Sensation of discomfort or pressure in the eye

        Risk factors for eye stroke

          • Being male
          • Age – eye stroke happens most commonly in people in their 60s
          • High blood pressure
          • High cholesterol
          • Diabetes
          • Narrowing of the carotid or neck artery

          Diagnosis by your eye doctor

          An eye stroke is diagnosed by reviewing your medical history, including any pre-existing health conditions (such as hypertension and diabetes), and performing a dilated eye exam. Your visual field and central visual acuity will be assessed, and your optic nerve and retina will be inspected. Advanced optometric imaging equipment may also be used to take pictures of your inner eye structure to check the blood flow in your eye.

          Treatment of eye stroke

          If the source of the blockage is a blood clot, you may be prescribed blood-thinning medication to dissolve the clot. Lowering pressure in the eye can also prompt the clot to flow out of the eye. To do this, your eye doctor may insert a needle into your eye and withdraw fluid. Another in-office treatment to reduce pressure in your eye can involve having you breathe into a paper bag to increase the level of carbon dioxide in your blood.

          The difference between eye stroke and brain stroke

          The main similarity between eye strokes and brain strokes is that typically, they are both caused by reduced blood flow. The risk factors for both problems are also similar, such as cardiovascular disease, age, and hypertension. However, brain strokes can also occur due to rupture and bleeding from an artery.

          Keep in mind that the blood circulation to the retina is the same circulation that flows to the front of the brain, so eye strokes and brain strokes are connected in that way. Also, eye strokes are a significant risk factor for experiencing a brain stroke.

          Symptoms of eye stroke? Visit your eye doctor for emergency eye care

          Even if your symptoms clear up quickly and your vision returns to normal, it’s critical to visit an eye care professional as soon as possible. It only takes a few minutes for eye strokes to cause permanent damage. Also, a comprehensive eye exam can reveal that you are at risk of having a stroke in the brain. Therefore, a visit to a nearby eye clinic can help prevent the debilitating trauma of brain stroke.

          Rye Eye Care, your Rye eye doctor for eye exams and eye care

          Alternatively, book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

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          Rye contact lenses – What’s the best way to care for contact lenses?

          Guidelines from an eye clinic near you

          Most people who make the switch from eyeglasses to contact lenses love their new eyesight! Contact lenses are easy to use, safe for your eyes, and let the natural beauty of your face show without any eyewear in the way. However, to make sure your eyes stay healthy, there are several important guidelines on how to properly care for your contacts.

          Rye Eye Care Eye Doctor in Rye, New York

          Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a Comprehensive eye exam, Pediatric eye exam and Contact lens eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Is LASIK eye and vision surgery an option for you ? Our Rye eye doctor is always ready to answer your questions about eye disease and Contact lenses.

          Wear disposables – or disinfect daily

          The best way to minimize the amount of daily care that your contact lenses use is to wear high quality daily disposable lenses. We sell premium brands of dailies at our eye clinic. With these, all you need to do is insert them, remove them from your eyes, and toss them in the garbage.

          If you wear daily wear lenses, then it’s critical to disinfect nightly! Wash your hands with soap and water, dry with a lint-free towel, and remove your contact lenses before you go to bed. Clean them by rubbing with a recommended multipurpose solution, and store in a contact lens dispenser filled with disinfecting solution. After you insert your lenses again the next day, rinse the contact lens dispenser with a sterile solution (not tap water) and leave it open to dry.

          You need a prescription to buy contact lenses

          Some people make the mistake of thinking that contacts are an over-the-counter item that requires almost no care. Our eye clinic staff stresses how this isn’t true! Contacts come in many different sizes, powers, and types, and you need a qualified eye care professional to issue a prescription for the best contact lenses for your eyes and vision. Not all contacts can give sharp vision to every set of eyes. Also, some people have eye conditions (such as dry eye or eye allergies) that require the use of only certain material lenses and disinfectants.

          Daily contact lenses are meant for daytime, not for sleep time

          It may be convenient to leave your contact lenses in your eyes while you sleep, but it’s not safe. The risk of eye infection rises dramatically when sleeping in contacts.

          Dailies last one day

          The main benefit of daily disposable contact lenses is that you insert a fresh, new lens into your eye every day. As a result, your contact lenses are always clean. Even the process of disinfection can put your contacts in touch with bacteria from your hands and a dirty contact lens dispenser, so dailies offer ultimate cleanliness. However, to state the obvious – if you wear them more than once, all the benefits are gone.

          What NOT to do with contact lenses

            • Never, ever rinse your contact lenses in tap water, this practice can allow dangerous sight-threatening bacteria to breed in your eye and cause a serious eye infection.
            • Saliva is not a hygienic lubricating solution for contact lenses! Don’t put your contacts in your mouth to rewet them.
            • Don’t wear your contact lenses in the shower, hot tub, swimming pool, or when doing anything where water gets in your eyes.
            • Don’t use bottled water to rinse lenses, they must be cleaned with approved disinfectants and solutions.
            • Never share your contact lens dispenser with anyone else.

            To learn more about how to care for your contacts, to replenish your supply of lenses, or to book a contact lenses eye exam or fitting, contact an eye clinic near you for an appointment.

            Rye Eye Care, your Rye eye doctor for eye exams and eye care

            Alternatively, book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

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            Rye Eye Care – First Aid for Eyes

            As hard as you try to avoid injury to your delicate eyes, eye emergencies can still happen. Because you can’t prevent every accident, it’s important to know how to handle them. By responding quickly with the appropriate first aid and contacting an eye clinic near you for urgent eye care, you can reduce the risk of permanent damage to your vision.

            Rye Eye Care Eye Doctor in Rye, New York

            Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a Comprehensive eye exam, Pediatric eye exam and Contact lens eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Is LASIK eye and vision surgery an option for you ? Our Rye eye doctor is always ready to answer your questions about eye disease and Contact lenses.

            If you get chemicals in your eyes

            If you wear contact lenses, remove them immediately! Keeping contacts in your eyes can hold the offensive chemical against your cornea, potentially leading to permanent damage and pain.

            If chemicals splash into your eye, hold your eyelid open with clean fingers and flush your eye immediately with cool water. Continue to do this for about 15 minutes. Then, call an eye clinic for assistance with eye emergencies. If you are advised to go to the nearest emergency room, take the container of the chemical with you so you can show the doctors exactly what your eye was exposed to.

            When something is stuck in your eye

            If an object gets lodged in your eye or under your eyelid – do not rub your eye! Rubbing your eye can cause much more damage. If the object isn’t embedded in your eye, you can attempt to remove it by following these steps:

            • Wash your hands with soap and warm water
            • Flush your eye with water
            • Gently pull your upper eyelid down over the top of your lower eyelid. This can help your eye to tear, flushing the object out.
            • If you can see the object, try to remove it gently by wiping it with a clean, wet washcloth.

            If you aren’t able to extract the object easily, don’t persist. Instead, contact your eye doctor or go to a local eye clinic for medical assistance.

            If you get a cut in or near your eye

            Don’t rub your eye or the surrounding area if you get any type of cut or scratch. Just bandage the eye gently, and don’t attempt to remove any particles that may be stuck. It’s best to leave that to a professional eye care specialist! Contact a nearby eye clinic for assistance, and in the meantime, avoid taking aspirin or any nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories, such as ibuprofen, because they can increase bleeding.

            Rye Eye Care, your Rye eye doctor for eye exams and eye care

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            Rye LASIK – What to Expect After LASIK?

            Taylor Swift got laser eye surgery!

            LASIK is a popular way to escape the inconvenience of wearing prescription eyeglasses and contact lenses. To get a better idea of what to expect from laser eye surgery, just ask Taylor Swift – she recently underwent this life-changing procedure. Or, read the following information that our eye clinic has to share about LASIK:

            Is LASIK always successful?

            Although there are no guarantees, laser eye surgery has an impressive success rate. A review of 97 studies showed that 99.5% of people who had LASIK went on to enjoy visual acuity better than 20/40, as published in the Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery. However, some people still have to wear glasses or contact lenses occasionally after laser eye surgery.

            Certain factors affect whether LASIK is more or less successful:

            • The skill and experience of your eye surgeon
            • Your vision prescription; laser eye surgery is best at correcting low to moderate prescriptions (up to +6 diopters for farsightedness, up to 6 diopters of astigmatism (cylinder), and up to -12 diopters of nearsightedness)
            • Good ocular health and good overall health
            • Eye maturity – a stable vision prescription

            What’s the recovery from LASIK?

            Although laser eye surgery is done pretty quickly – taking about 30 minutes start-to-finish, the recovery is a bit longer than that. You may need to take painkillers immediately after the procedure to reduce discomfort. Many people also experience itching, burning, or the sensation that something is stuck in the eye.

            Your eye clinic may provide you with a prescription for eye drops to moisturize your eyes and prevent infection. In addition, you may be given eye shields to wear while your eyes heal – like Taylor Swift was sporting in post-LASIK videos that her mom shared with the world! Eye shields will help you from accidentally rubbing your eyes before the cornea has a chance to heal. In fact, FDA guidelines recommend wearing an eye shield at night until about a month after LASIK.

            Other recommendations for recovery include:

            • Don’t partake in any non-contact sports for the first few days after laser eye surgery
            • Wait about 2 weeks before applying lotion (including sunscreen) or make-up on or around your eyes
            • Sit on the sidelines instead of joining any contact sports games, which put you at risk of getting poked in the eye
            • Don’t swim or sit in a hot tub for 1-2 months after LASIK

            Rye Eye Care Eye Doctor in Rye, New York

            Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a Comprehensive eye exam, Pediatric eye exam and Contact lens eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Is LASIK eye and vision surgery an option for you ? Our Rye eye doctor is always ready to answer your questions about eye disease and Contact lenses.

            Local Eye clinic in Rye, New York

            Are there side effects from LASIK?

            Some people will experience dry eyes or double vision, or they’ll see halos and starbursts around lights for a long time after the surgery. Also, you may have fluctuating or blurry vision and increased light sensitivity. But these symptoms are generally short-lived.

            Is LASIK for you?

            That’s a question to be answered after consultation and eye exam at an eye clinic near you. Book an appointment with our eye doctor to discuss your candidacy for laser eye surgery.

            Rye Eye Care, your Rye eye doctor for eye exams and eye care

            Alternatively, book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

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